EMMETT BREEN'S
RED CROWN TAVERN




The Red Crown Tavern, a red-brick and tile structure, was constructed and owned by
Emmett Breen, a Parkville banker and developer. The main building, which generally
faced the west, housed a service station and a combination fountain and restaurant.
A screened porch, near the rear of the building, was only a few yards from a smaller
brick structure which comprised two motel units, separated by a two car garage.
Directly across the highway was "Slim's Castle," a combination service station and
cafe constructed by Charles (Slim) Myers. Bridget Breen's great uncle, Emmett Breen,
was the owner of the Red Crown at the time that the Barrow Gang had graced his
establishment with their presence. E.J. Breen obtained several items from the cabins
rented by Bonnie and Clyde and had passed down a couple of those items to Bridget,
that the Platte County sheriff's department let him keep. Among these items, were a
hypodermic syringe, two syringe needles, a vial that's labeled "Atropine Sulphate",
and a vial labeled "20 hypodermic tablets - morphine sulphate." In addition to these
medical needs, Barrow had also left behind, a pair of binoculars which carries the
inscription "Signal Corps. U.S. Army." A special thanks goes out to Bridget Breen.


click here for larger view







Barrow Gang's drug kit - containing the syringe and Atropine and Morphine Sulphate meds



Drug Kit photo by Ed Kendrick - Courtesy of the Breen Family and Jim Spawn





Binoculars photo - Courtesy of Bridget Breen




In Blanche Barrow's memoirs, she told of Clyde and Buck's looting of an armory. in Enid, Okla.,
and how they had obtained guns, ammunition and several pairs of field glasses, saying how they
needed the glasses, to scan the roads to see if they were blocked - so that they wouldn't drive into
a trap. Blanche had related how she had spent many nights with a pair of field glasses to her eyes,
watching while the others had slept. She said that she would sit on top of the car to get a better
view of the surroundings. She would also look at the moon and the stars through the field glasses.








Article I came across on the waitress, dated June 9, 1965, then went by the married name
Vivian Mason. This was a death announcement regarding her father Wm. Albert Smitson.



Article I came across on the waitress, dated June 10, 1975, then went by the married name
Vivian Mason. This was a death announcement regarding her mother Susan Smitson.







MORE ON THE RED CROWN FIRE





VINTAGE RED CROWN TAVERN MATCHES

Circa 1942 match pack cover from the collection of
Jim Spawn - Editor of "The Restorer" magazine





RED CROWN TAVERN BUSINESS CARD

1930s business card from the collection of
Jim Spawn - Editor of "The Restorer" magazine





Advertisement from the Red Crown that ran in the 1932 Platte County Fair Premium book

County Fair Premium book ad, from the collection of
Jim Spawn - Editor of "The Restorer" magazine








Red Crown Tavern & Gas Station
Advertising Blotter
Platte City, Missouri

Hideout collection item

Jim Lee, who's name appears on the above blotter ad, ran the Red Crown Tavern in the mid to late 1930s.
He and his family lived in the cabins. Later, he opened and ran a top notch restaurant in downtown Kansas City.
His son, Don Lee, followed in his footsteps and in 1960 bought the Savoy Grill, the oldest continuously operating
restaurant in KC. In 1965, Don bought the Hotel Savoy. Don remembers playing on the roof of the Red Crown as a boy.

Hotel Savoy & Savoy Grill
A Brief History by Valerie Lee





JIM LEE'S MID 1930s DINING MENU
Menu courtesy of Jim Spawn - Editor of "The Restorer" magazine



1937 SAVOY GRILL AD


1954 SAVOY GRILL AD



Jim Lee's Kansas City menu
http://paris-of-the-plains.blogspot.com/2013/02/ephemeral-city-jim-lees-Menu.html


1937 RED CROWN AD




HOME OF THE FAMOUS DOLLAR DINNERS



APRIL 8, 1942
Jim Lee Brawl





Red Crown Tavern & Gas Station
Early 1950s photo taken by Richard Klasinski at the time it was owned and
operated by Frank and Lucy Klasinski. It shows the cabins on the left.

Platte County Historical Society photograph by Richard Klasinski






Remarkable Painting of the Red Crown Tavern & Gas Station
Artist: Elizabeth (Betty) Jean Dennis (Klasinski) 1925-2006


Hideout contributor: Tom Dennis
Mr. Dennis was kind enough to share with us an image of his mother's painting. His uncle,
Richard Klasinski, was the photographer who took the photo from which the painting was made!
The Klasinski family had also been the owners of the Red Crown from about 1952 to about 1966.

FRANK AND LUCY KLASINSKI
Red Crown's owners and operators from 1952 to about 1966

photo of his Grandparents by Tom Dennis


"Tom's Nostalgia Page" (Full Story Here)
http://tomsbrewing.info/www/nostalgia/red_crown/



Lifetime's Bonnie & Clyde mini series prop



MORE VINTAGE CLASSIFIED
Click on newspaper below

click here to view






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