WHERE THEY HAD WORKED
Although not a hideaway, Clyde Barrow had led quite a normal life in his earlier years working at
such places as The Brown Cracker & Candy Company, the Metzger Dairies, the United Glass &
Mirror Co., the Nu-Grape Beverage Company, A&K Auto Tops and at the Proctor & Gamble Plant.



UNITED GLASS & MIRROR CO.


1928 Yellow Pages Ads


Later, while on the run, Clyde Barrow would keep in touch with his old boss, Pat McCray.
He called him by his first name, which tells me that they had had a good relationship.





PROCTER & GAMBLE PLANT WHERE CLYDE HAD WORKED




A&K AUTO TOPS
Automobile Top Manufacturers
Main Street, Dallas, Texas






NU- GRAPE BEVERAGE CO.
Clyde had also worked here at 1719-23 South Ervay, Dallas.







The Bama Pie Company
3224 Pennsylvania Ave in South Dallas


Clyde worked here according to the Late Marie Scoma






TRINITY PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY


At age fourteen Barrow associate Floyd Hamilton worked at the Dallas Plant for a little
over four years tying off the cement bags for which he was paid six cents per hundred.


VINTAGE TRINITY CEMENT SACK


VINTAGE TRINITY WATCH FOB


VINTAGE TRINITY MATCHES


Floyd Hamilton's Social Security Application (FOIA)





THE GREAT ATLANTIC & PACIFIC TEA COMPANY
Floyd Hamilton had also worked for such places as The Shoreline Oil Company in Vivian, Louisiana,
V.C. Bilbo's Truck Lines 2931 Eagle Ford Rd. and for the A&P Store delivering their produce.





Victor Clifford Bilbo (below) who's V.C. Bilbo Truck Lines employed Floyd Hamilton,
had recalled many years later, bouncing a very young Bonnie Parker on his knee.



In 1915, when public transportation was non-existent in the western part of Dallas, Victor Clifford Bilbo (1894 - 1968) began operating
a jitney (small bus) line from downtown to Cement City, Gates, Sowers, Irving, and other outlying communities. Paying five cents per
ride, passengers often sat three deep and hung on running boards of Bilbo's Model T Ford touring cars. He often took people to
hospitals and funerals free of charge. In August 1927, because of new state franchise laws, the Bilbo jitneys were replaced by buses.





HIGGINBOTHAM-BAILEY-LOGAN COMPANY



900-6 Jackson Dallas, Texas
Wholesale Dry Goods

Emma Parker had worked here 10 hours each day, 7 days a week doing "piece work" sewing mens cover-alls.



VILBIG BROS

Bonnie's brother Hubert "Buster" Parker had worked here.



BROWN CRACKER & CANDY COMPANY


1929 newspaper ad



Wholesale Manufacturers
Crackers, Cakes and Candies
603-11 Caruth

Named above is where Clyde Barrow had worked. Clyde's first noted girlfriend, Grace Donegan also
worked there, as did Bill Decker, years before. Built in 1911, the Brown Cracker & Candy Company
had remained there until the 1940ís and later it was purchased by the Sunshine Biscuit Company.





Clyde's brother LC Barrow had spent the last thirteen years of his life
working as a truck driverfor the Overhead Door Company of Texas.



EVANS GRINDING COMPANY
Site of Hargrave's Cafe which is located on Swiss Ave. This is where Bonnie had worked as a waitress.


>

Rare inside view of Hargrave's Cafe today!




Rear view of Hargrave's Cafe, where Bonnie may have taken her smoke breaks.





WESTERN UNION (DALLAS, TEXAS)



Western Union Messengers (circa 1923)
Photo and information below, courtesy of Jason Roberts


 
Jason Roberts wife's 92 year old grandfather had worked for
the Western Union downtown as a bicycle messenger when he was
12 to 14 years old. (picture of him and a few other young boys
that all worked there at the time). He had mentioned wearing
down three different bicycles during his tenure there. He would
buy the Pierce-Arrow's bikes with shaft drives instead of
chains at a shop over on Akard run by Smoot Schmid. He also
remembered that Ted Hinton would come by in the evenings on
his motorcycle and pick up his mother who worked as a bookkeeper
at the Western Union. He said that all the boys would laugh when
they'd see her sitting on the back of that motorcycle driving off.
He also sadly remembered having to deliver death notices to
families late into the night. He mentioned something about it
being required by the government to send these notices out,
even if the family had already been contacted by phone.
He mentioned having to work the late night shifts(10PM-4AM)
during the summers in rain/sleet/snow/or hail. He said that
Ted Hinton was a couple of years older than him and that he
had just left the Western Union to go work for the Special
Deliveries division of the Post Office which is why he had
a motorcycle. He didn't recall Clyde working there but he did
remember that the guy who owned the bicycle shop had a strange
name like Smoot Schmid, and that he later became Sheriff and
hired Hinton as a Deputy. In the photo is Jason's wife's
grandfather (third from left) with the other Western Union
Messengers (circa 1923). Clyde was born in 1909, Jason's wife's
grandfather was born in 1910 - about the same age. Jason's
grandfather-in-law couldn't remember the names of any of the
other boys since it was so long ago. 



It was actually LC Barrow, and not Clyde who worked for Western Union at the time Hinton did.





AMERICAN CAFE ("COURTHOUSE CAFE")


Dallas Public Library

This building was home to several cafes over the years. Bonnie Parker is said to have been a waitress
in the white framed building in above photo, seen between the Garage and the Gas Company.
The Palm Hotel was located directly above the Gas Company on the corner.





LePori Farms

Clyde picked fruit in the Santerre orchards one summer,
until he was caught stealing by Gustave Santerre.

Bonnie Parker spent a summer picking beans on Cyril LePori's
farm near Fishtrap Road in West Dallas to earn money for a dress.




Doug LePori left in above photo. Longtime farmhand Tim Krause right in above photo.
Not sure if Tim Krause is related to the Krause side of Bonnie's family!


Doug joined his father Cyril in farming in 1948, working 25 Trinity River bottomland acres along a gravel road later renamed MacArthur Blvd.
Cyril LePori died in the mid 1990s at age 96, farming three weeks before his passing. Doug LePori's turnip greens, mustard greens and collard
greens go to area Tom Thumb stores. The farm has been supplying the supermarket chain since 1950. Bonnie Parker picked beans one summer to
earn money for a dress. When she came up $1.68 short, his father fronted her the money. Land sales have reduced the farm to less than 10 acres.
above story culled from ILA News~





1932 ADDRESSES FROM THE DALLAS DIRECTORY


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