WHO SAID WHAT ?
"From their lips to our ears"


"Clyde went from being a schoolboy to a rattlesnake"
RALPH FULTS (on Eastham's effect on his friend)

"It's the bunk about me smoking cigars"
"Tell them I don't smoke cigars"
BONNIE PARKER (When asked by Percy Boyd what
she wanted him to relay to the newspapers)

"Let's take 'em for a Lark"
CLYDE BARROW  (referring to Ruston kidnap victims)

"They told me that when they got ready, they
were going to tie us up to a tree and blow
our brains out"
SOPHIA STONE  (1933 Kidnap victim of B&C)

"Hold on to your hats, it may not have a bottom"
CLYDE BARROW (Clyde's remark before Wellington crash)

"Boy, we'll get Raymond out and we won't
go hungry anymore"
BONNIE PARKER (on planning to bust Raymond
Hamilton out of prison)

"Stop, for God's sake, stop. Don't shoot
anymore! You've already killed him"
BLANCHE BARROW (When the posse kept firing
on her dying husband, Buck Barrow)

"Raymond never did get along with Clyde
because he always considered Clyde a little
too trigger happy"
FLOYD HAMILTON (talking about his brother's
feelings towards Clyde Barrow)

"A short girl with plenty of curves and a hard
face covered by enough makeup to grow a crop"
FLOYD HAMILTON (his description of Mary O'Dare)

"I didn't commit that murder. The man that did
it is dead. If he wasn't, I wouldn't say anything anyway"
RAYMOND HAMILTON (At the time of execution, he
was asked, if he wanted to confess to the
Hillsboro murder)

"Well...goodbye all"
RAYMOND HAMILTON (a moment before being electrocuted) 

"My decision was for Frank Hamer. I talked
to nobody about it, but my own mind kept
tellng me that Hamer was the man"
LEE SIMMONS (His reason for picking Frank
Hamer as the man to track down Bonnie and
Clyde)

“Never go crooked. It's for the love of a man that I'm gonna
have to die.” I don't know when, but I know it can't be long".
BONNIE PARKER (To Percy Methvin, two nights before her death)

"No man but the undertaker will ever get me,
if officers ever cripple me to where I see
they will take me alive, I'll take my own life"
CLYDE BARROW

"I'm just going on 'til they get me,
then I'm out like Lottie's eye."
CLYDE BARROW (What Clyde said to sister Nell)  

“The chickens are coming home to roost tommorrow, about nine o'clock".
FRANK HAMER (Call to son about B&C on the night before ambush)

“This is it. it's Clyde"
Ted Hinton (His whisper to Alcorn awaiting Barrow's arrival)

"I was aiming at Clyde Barrow's head when I shot"
DEPUTY PRENTISS OAKLEY (speaking of ambush)

"She was a very pretty young woman with
taffy-colored hair that glistened red in the sun,"
TED HINTON (Describing Bonnie Parker's looks)

“I hope we haven’t just blown an innocent
farmer and his wife all to hell!”
TED HINTON (His first thoughts following the ambush)

"I hate to bust the cap on a woman, especially
when she was sitting down, however if it
wouldn't have been her, it would have been us".
FRANK A. HAMER (After slaying Bonnie in ambush)

"The law caught the kids, somewhere in Louisiana"
EMMA PARKER (When told of the ambush)

"I prayed only last night that I might see
him alive again, just one more time!"
CUMIE BARROW (When told of her son's death)

"It is much better that they were both killed,
rather then to have been taken alive"
BLANCHE BARROW (On hearing of the deaths of
Clyde and Bonnie)

"I admit that I am relieved"
W.D. JONES (On hearing of the deaths of
Clyde and Bonnie).

"He had her for two years. Look what it got her.
He's not going to have her anymore. She's mine now".
CUMIE BARROW (On burying Bonnie apart from Clyde)

"I'm glad Bonnie and Clyde went out like they
did, because it's better then getting caught".
ROY THORNTON (Bonnie's husband)

"Me and Clyde had our differences, but we was
still friends, no matter what it looked like".
RAYMOND HAMILTON (When told of Clyde's demise)

"I had to straighten myself up...when I started
to do that, I discovered that God was doing great
things for me"
FLOYD HAMILTON

BONNIE AND CLYDE MOVIE SCREENWRITER - ROBERT BENTON
Benton, who was from Waxahachie, Texas says:
"I'd grown up hearing all the stories about Bonnie and Clyde.
My father went to their funeral in 1934. Everyone knew someone
who'd been robbed or kidnapped by them. Any farmer that had an
old car that didn't work, they'd take it out, shoot it full of
holes, pour some animal blood on it and show it off as the car
Bonnie and Clyde were killed in"